Home About Us Classrooms Activities Facilities  
Playground Policies Bulliten Board Gallery  
Policies

Parent Policies

     
     

Our Philosophy  

We believe that ALL children are important, special, and precious.  We put the children first and foremost.  Our policies and values reflect this by providing quality programs, qualified teachers and high standards that promote a healthy, safe and clean environment

Our Mission

Our goal is for our teachers to create a supportive and safe environment that provides children with an opportunity to explore and investigate other children, nature and the toys that surround them.  By structuring the day with free play in our organized learning centers and carefully planned programs, we provide the opportunity for children to grow and develop.  Emphasis will be placed on concern for others and the environment.  Our ultimate goal is to act as an extension of the home environment where children are loved, respected and cared for.  We hope to achieve this through daily contact with every parent, parent meetings, parent committees and newsletters

Parent Agreement

We urge you to read this manual carefully.  It is extremely important that you understand the policies that serve as guidelines in the operation of this centre.  After you have read over the Manual, please sign the attached parent agreement and return it to your child’s teacher to be placed in your child’s file. 

Parent Communication

  • Bulletin Board:  We encourage you to review bulletin board contents on a daily basis for new information.  On the entrance way bulletin board you can find a copy of the Day Care Act, parent handbook, our facility license, a copy of our most recent facility inspection, a copy of our behaviour management policy, our menu, a list of our parent committee members, our most recent parent meeting minutes, and funding provided by the minister of Community Services.
  • Every classroom has a copy of their daily program planning and routine posted on a bulletin board outside of their classroom in the cubby areas. A copy of the weekly program is emailed out every Friday to all parents.
  • Every class has a means of communicating daily information concerning your child: length of nap, how well they ate, generally how their day went, etc.  The toddler rooms record this information in a duo tang which is available for you to review at the end of the day in your child’s cubby area.  This information is kept on file for 6 months.  The preschool classrooms record the daily information on white boards on their entrance doors which is erased at the end of each day.
  • Newsletter:  Because the preschool is such a busy, constantly changing environment, we will be emailing a newsletter every second month with information about each of the four groups. 
  • A Calendar of Events outlining specific upcoming events in your child’s group will be distributed at the beginning of each month.
  • Parent Meetings:  A minimum of two meetings per year will be held with parents to discuss concerns, express ideas, and exchange information.  There will occasionally be guest speakers as well.  Parents are encouraged to attend these meetings and to review the minutes, which will be posted on the main bulletin board.
  • Anytime you wish to discus your child at length, it is best to arrange an appointment with the staff and/or Director. This will allow for privacy and full
    attention.
  • You will find our policies and relevant information on our website: www.thechildresngarden.ca
  • You can email your child’s teachers directly with information about your child, to let them know your child will be absent or late, any questions you may have for them, etc. The classroom emails are as follows:
    jr.toddler@hotmail.com
    sr.toddler@hotmail.com
    jr.preschool@hotmail.com
    sr.preschool@hotmail.com

THE PARENT/GUARDIANS/GUARDIANS ROLE

Each parent/guardian can assist the staff in providing the best care possible for their children in the following ways:

a) Bring your child to the centre by 9:00 for full participation in the a.m. activity
b) Call or email the centre before 8:30 am of your child will not be attending.
c) Each morning, help your child as he/she undresses, put his/her shoes away, and
bring him/her to a staff member in the activity area. Write any relevant
information in the logbook.
d) Sign your child in at drop off and out at pick up.
e) Allow your child time to put toys away in the evening
f) Take home soiled clothing each evening and return daycare clothing on your child’s next scheduled day
g) Make sure you bring in diapers and wipes when they are requested of you.
g) If someone other than yourself is picking up your child, inform the centre as
soon as possible. The person must be on the authorization to pick up list.
h) Be sure that you child is adequately dressed for outdoor play each day.
i) Take you child's artwork home weekly.
k) Be sure that your child's name is on each article of clothing

Probationary Period

All children entering the center are subject to a 3-month probationary period.  This allows for evaluation time to determine the suitability of the Centre for the child’s needs.  At the end of the three months The Children’s Garden has the right to propose alternate arrangements suitable to the child’s needs.

Arrival and Departure

The latest drop-off time in the morning is 9amPlease respect that there is a cut-off time for multiple reasons:

1.  The staff put a lot of time into creating the programming and it starts at 9am.  Further, arriving after this time causes disruptions to programming.
2.  The cook needs to know how many children she is cooking for by 9am so that she can prepare adequate amounts of food, or prepare less if there will be multiple absences.
3.  Sometimes if staff are sick, or if there are other things that need to be done in the centre, we need to know how many children are coming by 9am so that we can move children and free-up a staff accordingly, as necessary, as soon as possible.  Moving them later in the morning causes disruptions to programming, and we lose out on precious hours that could've been used to better the centre.
4.  Children thrive off of routine, and if they come in at a weird time which they are not used to, it can sometimes throw off their entire day.

Exceptions to this rule will be made for families ON A RARE BASIS for the following reasons (not on a daily basis):

1.  Appointments.
2.  Weather.
3.  Some kind of emergency, such as flat tire.

When exceptions are made, we still expect to be notified by the cut-off time of 9amReasons for this are the same reasons applying to the latest drop-off time being 9am.  Cooking lunch, programming, and moving children to free-up a staff. 

Unfortunately, since these policies are not being respected by all, a new policy is being put in place to avoid disruptions, wasted food, not enough food, and wasted staff time.

If you are coming to the daycare, do not arrive by 9am, and do not call us to notify us that you are coming prior to 9am, the following things will happen, in this order:

The first time - you will be warned that an additional $20 fee is being added to next month's childcare bill.

The second time - you will be charged an additional $20 fee on next month's childcare bill.

The third time - you will be charged an additional $20 fee on next month's childcare bill.

The fourth time - you will not be allowed to leave your child at the centre on this day.

Items to be kept at the Daycare

You are asked to keep your child’s cubby stocked with the following:

  • 2 changes of clothing (shirts, pants, shoes, socks, underwear)
  • Appropriate outdoor clothing (splash pants year round and snow pants during the winter months)
  • Diapers, wipes, and creams
  • Plush sleep toy and/or blanket (if desired)
  • Indoor shoes with treads (children are asked to change into their indoor shoes upon arrival to cut down on the dirt brought in from outside.  This will help keep the environment clean and safe)

Please check lists posted on class bulletin boards for seasonal requirements as well (e.g. sunscreen and water-play clothes in summer)

Parents must also label their child’s belongings.  We will make every effort to ensure that all items are returned to you.  However, when items are not properly labeled, it is difficult to do so. 
Also, please ensure that your child wears only those clothes that you won’t mind getting dirty.
The Children’s Garden assumes no responsibility for clothing getting stained within the normal confines of the daily activities.

The daycare is not responsible for the loss or damage of any personal items brought to the daycare.

Hours of Operation

The Children’s Garden is open from 7:30 am to 5:30 pm Monday through Friday.

Children will not be admitted into the daycare earlier than 7:30 a.m.  Our staff is required to be at work 10 minutes prior to the beginning of their shift to prepare for the day.  Therefore, even though there is staff inside we ask that you please not ring the bell until 7:30 a.m. The last shift of the day ends at 5:30.  Please arrive before 5:30 p.m. to pick up your child so you will be leaving by 5:30 and that you are not infringing on the personal time of the staff.   Should any child be picked up after 5:30, parents will be charged a late fee (see late fee policy below).

The Children’s Garden is open year round with the following exceptions:

  • Labour Day                                   ◊  Good Friday                   
  • Thanksgiving Day                         ◊  Easter Monday
  • Remembrance Day                        ◊  Victoria Day
  • Christmas Day                              ◊  Canada Day
  • Boxing Day                                   ◊  Natal Day
  • New Year’s Day

On Christmas Eve and New Year’s Eve the daycare will close at 12:00pm.

In the event of inclement weather, the daycare may close depending on the severity of the weather.  If you are uncertain, you can call the daycare and there will be a message on the phone.  We may also have to close mid-day due to the weather.  In this event, you will be contacted immediately and expected to come and get your child/children as soon as possible.

Late Pick-up Fee Policy

The daycare closes at 5:30.  You are free to pick up your child before this time but will be charged a late fee for arriving after 5:30.  You will be charged up until the time you leave the building. For example, if you arrive at 5:30 and do not leave the building until 5:45 (as it can take this long to pack up and leave) you would be charged $25. Late fees are as follows:

5:30pm – 5:40pm……$20.00
After 5:40 it will be $1/minute for each additional minute you are late.

If we have not been able to make contact with parents by 6:00 p.m., we will contact the emergency contact person listed on your child’s application form.  If the emergency contact person cannot be reached, Child and Family Services will be contacted and the child will be taken into custody by the appropriate agency.

If a parent/guardian is late more than once in any 4 week period without notifying
the centre, the following will apply:

- 1st Time Late: You will be assessed a late fee. You will also be given a verbal
warning.

- 2nd Time Late: You will be assessed a late fee. You will also receive a letter reminding
you of our closing time and our late policy.

- 3rd Time Late: You will be assessed a late fee. You will be given written notification of termination one month from the date of the email or letter. 

Please note that you will still be issued a late fee even though you do call to inform that you will be late.

Vacations

If your child is not present at daycare due to a vacation, you will not be reimbursed for the number of days he/she is away.  In June of every year an email will be sent requesting your child’s vacation time during the summer months.  Most parents are able to respond as they had already booked the time off at work.  Letting us know your child’s vacation dates will allow us to schedule staff vacations.

A mandatory one week’s vacation during the summer is required. This week can be any time during the month of July or August. Of course, your child’s vacation may exceed one week.  This will ensure that all children receive a summer vacation away from the daycare. A child’s work is play and each child deserves a yearly break from the structured routine of daycare.  If you aren’t planning on taking any vacation during the summer months hopefully you have a parent or relative who would be willing to take your child to do some very deserved summer activities like going on picnics, to the beach, playground, park, etc. Some children didn’t get a summer break in previous years and this policy is acting in their best interest.   It is sad and hard on the kids who don’t go on vacation to see friends trickle in and out with vacation stories.  This policy also helps us ensure that staff is able to receive their well deserved vacation.  Some daycares close for a week or two during the summer months so all of the teachers get their vacation at the same time but we have chosen to stay open the entire year for added flexibility for the parents.  We must have your child’s vacation dates by June 15th.

Administration Fee – Some families travel to other parts of the country, to foreign countries, or are fortunate enough to have the summer off and they want to withdraw their child for the months of July and August. If we can accommodate this request there will be a $25 administration fee charged once your banking information is re-instated. September fees must be paid in August in order to hold the space for September.

Storm Days

If your child cannot make it to daycare due to a storm, or if the daycare must close due to stormy weather, you will not be reimbursed for the number of days closed.

Conditions that will cause the center to be closed for the day during a storm are as follows: the police are urging people to stay off the roads, schools and numerous businesses are closed, Metro Transit buses are not running, low visibility and / or the electricity is out.

If a storm starts throughout the day conditions that will result in the center closing early are as follows: Schools and other businesses are closing, low to zero visibilities, Metro Transit buses stop running and power outage at the daycare. In a case where the center is going to have to close we want to be able to contact the parents in the most efficient way. Therefore, we ask that you let us know whether it is better to contact you by email or by phone. For those who are able to check their work email regularly you will be emailed.  Those who do not have access to email will be called.  If you are uncertain as to whether we will be closing early and you are not accessible via email please contact us

Sick Days

Parents are asked to keep their child at home if they are sick.  If a child is brought to the daycare and they are sick, the parents/guardian will be contacted to come and pick up their child immediately.  You will not be reimbursed for the number of days the child is away sick, and due to ratios you will not be able to “make up” sick time by bringing your child on unscheduled days.  For some conditions a medical certificate may be required for re-entrance to the daycare.  If a child is sick in the morning they cannot attend in the afternoon.

Please contact the daycare with the nature of your child’s sickness so we will be able to communicate to the other parents and be aware of symptoms should they appear in other children.  For specifics on sick days please see the attached Childhood Illness Policy

Medication

When a child who has been sick returns to the daycare and requires a staff member to administer medication, the following must be adhered to. Parents must fill out and sign a medication consent form prior to staff administrating medication. All medication must

  • be in its original bottle from the pharmacy and, 2) have the child’s name, the doctor’s name, dosage and frequency to be administrated on the label. Outdated medicine, containers with another’s child’s name on it, or transferred medication from one bottle to another will not be accepted. Medications (both children and staff) will be kept in a locked box in the fridge. If a staff member gives medication to a child it will be recorded on the Medication Chart and signed by the staff who administered it.
  • Non-prescription medication such as Tylenol may be administrated; however it must be authorized by a parent’s signature on the Medication Chart as well.

Nutrition

Morning and afternoon snacks as well as a lunch are provided for all children.   These meals are prepared fresh daily and meet with health department standards for nutritional content.
 
There is a four-week rotational menu that is posted on both levels as well as on the website for parents to view at any time (on occasion we will need to alter the menu. Should this happen we will let you know). 

In the event of a birthday or special occasion, you may wish to provide a special treat to your child’s class (your child’s teacher will be able to tell you how many children are expected to be in attendance that day).  Unfortunately we cannot accept any cakes, cupcakes, cookies, or sweets of any kind. Please inform your child’s teacher ahead of time if you will be bringing something in and they can help you figure out what is acceptable to bring in. 

As stated in the Daycare Regulations:
3)    Each snack served to a child who is enrolled in a day care program must

(a) be nutritious; and
(b)    provide servings from at least 2 of the food groups identified by Health Canada, including at least 1 serving of vegetables or fruit.

From time to time we have children enrolled who are extremely allergic to nuts of any kind and form, including peanut better. An allergy of this sort can be life-threatening. Even the smell of peanut butter can bring about a severe reaction. As a result, we ask that you do not bring nuts of any kind (even in granola bars) to the daycare. Also, please be aware that as even the smell of peanut butter can be harmful, we are also asking that on the days your child comes to daycare, they do not have peanut butter for breakfast.

Breastfeeding: We acknowledge that some families choose to breastfeed up to two years and beyond. The Children’s Garden supports this and when requested, will provide a comfortable space for breastfeeding mothers (e.g. a chair in a quiet space). If breast milk is brought to the daycare for children it is to be labeled with the contents, date, and the child’s name.

Foods donated to or purchased for The Children’s Garden: Occasionally foods will be donated to or purchased for the daycare from an outside source. In this case, there are regulations that must be followed in order for us as a regulated childcare setting to be able to accept the food. These regulations are as follows:

5.6 Despite sections 5.4 and 5.5 some foods may be donated to or purchased for regulated child care settings under the following circumstances:
(i) the food is considered to be a low risk food by the Department of Agriculture, including whole fruits and vegetables that have not been cut except for the purpose of harvesting and dry non-potentially hazardous baked goods (i.e. those that do not contain cream, custard, cream cheese, meat or any potentially hazardous food as a filling or topping; and
(ii) the food brought into the program is acceptable to the licensee

5.7 Foods that have been donated to or purchased for a facility must:
(i) be labeled with the name of the source of the food;
(ii) include a list of ingredients and any special preparation, storage or serving instructions; and
(iii) be in accordance with Standard 6 (special dietary considerations).

Meal and Snack Routines: Daily meal and snack routines provide the children, staff and care providers with enough time to prepare the eating area, serve the food, consume the food and clean up. However, staff and caregivers are responsive to children’s cues around hunger and provide snacks and meals outside of the regular schedule as required. The children are also encouraged to respond to hunger and feelings of fullness and the children are not forced to finish food that has been served.

Napping / Quiet Time Policy

All children must have at least a 1-hour rest period.  Children are not necessarily required to sleep during this time, but they must stay on their mats.  Children who are not napping may have quiet activities after the first 30 minutes.  The duration of naptime will vary according to the needs of individual groups:       Toddlers – 12:30 – 2:30 and Preschoolers – 1:00 – 2:00. Please see our website for a write up regarding the benefits of napping.

Accidents/Incidents

In the event that your child is injured while in our care, a staff member will fill out an accident/incident report form. These forms will outline the nature of the injury, where and when it happened, what was done to treat the injury, who witnessed the injury and was involved in the child’s care.  You are asked to sign this form upon pick up  so that it may be placed in your child’s file.

Is Napping Necessary?

Daily naps for children are essential for good days and good nights. Many parents believe their child will sleep better at night without a nap during the day. However, if your child is overly tired, they may become stressed and irritable, and their behavior may actually worsen. Often they become overactive, making it difficult to fall asleep at bedtime. Only after age 5 will eliminating afternoon naps help a child go to bed earlier in the evening.

Napping daily can be beneficial for your children, working wonders for both their mood. Children who nap have longer attention spans and are less irritable than those who are not napping. Naps are valuable and when they are given up – usually sometime after 3 years of age – they should be replaced with a structured quiet time. Children need this time to re-group. This quiet time should be used for looking at books, working on puzzles and play that is less active. All children need to learn to entertain themselves and quietly play alone. It means that your child is forced to entertain himself for an hour or two, all by himself. This is a skill that children need to be learning, how to be able to keep themselves busy without an adult providing stimulus, without anything but their toys and their thoughts.

Daily naps for children are essential for good days and good nights. Many parents believe their child will sleep better at night without a nap during the day. However, if your child is overly tired, they may become stressed and irritable, and their behavior may actually worsen. Often they become overactive, making it difficult to fall asleep at bedtime. Only after age 5 will eliminating afternoon naps help a child go to bed earlier in the evening. Napping daily can be beneficial for your children, working wonders for both their mood. Children who nap have longer attention spans and are less irritable than those who are not napping. Naps are valuable and when they are given up – usually sometime after 3 years of age – they should be replaced with a structured quiet time. Children need this time to re-group. This quiet time should be used for looking at books, working on puzzles and play that is less active. All children need to learn to entertain themselves and quietly play alone. It means that your child is forced to entertain himself for an hour or two, all by himself. This is a skill that children need to be learning, how to be able to keep themselves busy without an adult providing stimulus, without anything but their toys and their thoughts.

Toddlers

Napping is vital to a toddler’s health and well-being. In fact, experts recommend that 2-to 3-year-olds get 10 to 12 hours of sleep during the night, with an additional 1 to 2 hours of shut-eye during the day.

Total sleep isn't the only factor affecting naps, though. Younger children tend to have a stronger "sleep drive." This means they have a stronger urge to break up their waking hours with some sleep — in other words, they can't stay awake for long stretches as easily as older children and adults.

Naps are important for your child's healthy mental and physical growth. More blood supply reaches parts of the body than when you're awake. Restoration is important; when you sleep your body restores itself. Especially with somebody who's young and developing.A daily nap refreshes a child so that she can maintain her energy, focus, and ability to learn for the rest of the day. Studies show that children who nap are more flexible and adaptable, have longer attention spans, and are less fussy than those who don't nap.

"Toddlers are going through a marathon of development," says Jodi Mindell, Ph.D., an associate professor of psychology at St. Joseph's University, in Philadelphia. "So much is happening intellectually and physically. Sleep is the only way they can restore themselves and keep up the pace." In fact, according to sleep expert Marc Weissbluth, M.D., author of Healthy Sleep Habits, Happy Children (Ballantine, 1999), naps facilitate your toddler's cognitive development. Research has found that cortisol, a hormone that increases with stress, falls dramatically during a nap. "As a result, your toddler awakens happier, more alert, and better prepared to learn about and explore his world."

"Naps are actually a learning opportunity," says Dr. Prazar. "When he takes a nap, your toddler gets some time alone to learn how to soothe or even entertain himself."

Research on napping suggests that an afternoon nap as short as ten minutes can enhance alertness, mood, and mental performance, especially after a night of poor sleep.

Preschoolers

Children three years of age and older generally shall not nap for more than two hours or rest on their mat without sleeping for more than 30 minutes. Children in this age group who do not sleep may be permitted to get up after the 30 minute mandatory rest period and shall be helped to have a quiet time with equipment or activities which will not disturb the napping children. Children in the age range from 3 to 5 vary in their sleep requirements. Some children may not require a nap at all and others may need a two hour nap or more. The individual child’s sleep needs may also depend on the child’s participation in activities at various times. Each child’s needs may vary from day to day. Keeping in mind that a child’s attention span is generally one minute per each year of age, 30 minutes on a cot without falling to sleep seems to be a very adequate opportunity to nap. Requiring children to be confined to a cot longer than the 30 minutes would challenge a young child’s ability to maintain quiet, nondisruptive behavior. Also, allowing the resting children off the cot and providing a space for them to play quietly meets the requirement of giving the sleeping children the opportunity to nap

MYTH: Children outgrow a nap by 3 years of age.
FACT: At age 4, more than 50 percent of children are still taking naps.

MYTH: All preschool children are required to sleep after lunch.
FACT: Regulation requires that a rest period be provided, however, children are never required to sleep. Many children do not need to sleep during the day if they have plenty of sleep at night. Flexibility, observation, and knowing the children are the keys.  Communication between parent and staff will help in this area (ie. if a child who never naps had a bad sleep, he may be encouraged to nap)

MYTH: Preschool children are required to nap for two hours after lunch.
FACT: In most cases this would be totally inappropriate. Children who nap usually do not need to sleep more than one hour. Providers should be flexible so that the needs of children are met and they can take naps of varying lengths of time dependent on the individual child's requirements.

MYTH: Children must be quiet and stay on their cots for the entire rest period.
FACT: Requiring a wide awake child to stay on a mat for two hours with nothing to do could be considered cruel or harsh treatment and should never be permitted. Children may be asked to rest on their mat with little or nothing to do for a maximum of thirty minutes. After 30 minutes, most children who need to sleep - will. Children who don't nap should then be allowed to play or read books.

MYTH: The room must be kept dark or children will not sleep.
FACT: Children who need to sleep - will sleep. Caregivers must have sufficient light to see and provide direct supervision of all sleeping children. Children who don't nap need adequate light to read books and play with appropriate materials.

MYTH: Shoes must be kept on or off. Providers are not sure about this but they usually go all one way or the other.
FACT: Shoes should usually be kept on during rest time due to the possibility of an emergency occurring but this is not required. Most children don't take their shoes off if caregivers don't make it an issue. If children can sleep on those cots, they certainly are not bothered by wearing shoes.

MYTH: It is not appropriate to permit children to nap with a teddy, doll, or special reminder of home.
FACT: Children are permitted to sleep with a stuffed animal, special “buddy”, or blankie. It is to be left in the child’s cubby basket until nap time and once nap time is over, it will go back in the cubby basket. If children play vs. snuggle with their nap toy then they will be warned that it will be taken away as it can be a distraction to others trying to fall asleep around them.

The Benefits of Naps

Increased Coginitive Functioning

In a recent study, researchers at NASA showed that a thirty to forty-minute power nap increased cognitive faculties by approximately 40 IQ test.

Better Health

Napping in general benefits heart functioning, hormonal maintenance, and cell repair, says Dr. Sara Mednick who is at the forefront of napping research. Research has shown that a nap can promote physical well-being, improve mood and memory, sharpen senses and revitalize a person. The neurons in brain functioning get to rest and recuperate from the day's stress. Intellectual performance improves from the boost a midday nap provides and accuracy in performance increases too. MRI's of nappers show that brain activity stays high throughout the day with a nap. Without one, it declines as the day wears on.

Science and psychology say we should embrace the siesta. Napping is not just for the young and the old. It can be a good thing for us all.

When you get enough sleep you can:

  • Pay attention better in school
  • Be creative and think of new ideas
  • Fight sickness so you stay healthy
  • Be in a good mood
  • Get along with friends and family
  • Solve problems better

Without enough sleep you can:

  • Forget what you learned
  • Have trouble making good choices
  • Be grumpy and in a bad mood
  • Have trouble playing games and sports
  • Be less patient with brothers, sisters, and friends
  • Have trouble listening to parents and teachers

 

Behavior / Safety Management

If the director(s) finds that a child’s behavior and/or actions are endangering the safety of the other children and staff, a conference will be arranged with the parents, the child’s teacher, and the director.   
It is the right of all children and staff to learn, teach, work and interact in a safe and secure environment free from any form of violence, threat, sexual connotations or gestures, abuse, mistreatment, harassment, derogatory or degrading conditions.  It is expected that parents, guardians, children and staff share the responsibility for creating an environment that is safe and secure for learning and teaching.

Should a child exhibit any of the forms of violence listed above toward another child or staff, the parent or guardian will be called to come pick up the child immediately.  A letter of warning will be issued stating that if the same form or any other form of violence is exhibited at any time during the course of the child’s care at the daycare he/she will be permanently expelled.  Monies will not be reimbursed.

Behaviour that puts the safety of the children at risk

If a child exhibits behavior that compromises the safety of the staff or the other children in the program, it will be recommended that a behaviour specialist come and observe the child to make recommendations for behaviour modification.  If the parents do not authorize the visit management has the right to inform the parents of withdrawal in 30 days from the program.

In the best interest of the child, the centre reserves the right to request the parent/guardian to make alternate childcare arrangements if the becomes apparent/guardian that a child is not adjusting to the center's environment. This will be done in consultation with the parent/guardians/and the Centre Director.

REQUIREMENT TO REPORT SUSPECTED ABUSE OR NEGLECT

Daycares are required to report any suspicion of child neglect or abuse to the Department of Child and Family Welfare.  Management will report any suspected abuse that a child discloses to a staff  member.  

It is not our responsibility to investigate or question the circumstances of the suspected abuse.  We will not inform you or anyone else of our suspicions. 

It is the Ministry’s responsibility to investigate any report and to inform all those involved of their investigation. 

The health and well-being of the children is our first concern.

Damage

The Children’s Garden will repair or replace broken daycare equipment & toys due to normal wear and tear. However, should your child purposely damage or break equipment or toys, then the item will be repaired or replaced at the cost of the parents.

Withdrawal from the Program

If you decide you no longer need the services of the daycare, you are to inform the Director and provide one month’s written notice, preferably via email so both parties have a copy of the notice.  If we are not given proper notification you will be responsible to pay for daycare fees that represent one month of fees once proper notification is given.  Non-attendance does not constitute withdrawal. 

Daycare Subsidy Plan

Parents who qualify for Daycare Subsidy must have full approval in place prior to attendance.   Any fees not covered by Subsidy are the parents' responsibility and are payable on the first of each month in advance.  Proof of qualification must be presented to provider prior to registration. 

CHILD CARE SUBSIDY POLICY

Child Care Subsidy, administered by the Department of the Community Services Provincial Government, is a monthly payment that helps eligible Nova Scotia families with the costs of child care. Families fill out an application and provide supporting documentation to apply.  Once the family is approved and authorization is established, the provider receives an authorization number and billing forms.  
Child care cannot start until authorization and billing forms are received unless the parent agrees to pay the regular fee.  Providers can only bill for the maximum number of the days that the family is qualified for, if the child actually attends.  If the child is booked to attend but does not, the provider can only bill subsidy for that day if the parent informs the provider that the child or their parent was ill or on holidays.  It is up to the parent to ensure that the provider is informed if the child is away because of illness or vacation.  If the provider is not informed, the parent will be responsible for the regular fee.  The fee for missed days that are not covered by subsidy is to be paid before the end of the month.

The parent is responsible for any fees over and above what subsidy pays on behalf of the family.  The parent portion is due on the first of the month

Description of our Programs

Music: The Children’s Garden offers children an opportunity to learn about music by experiencing it. This program runs from September through to June. Our energetic and dynamic music teacher finds a way to grab the children’s attention.  Movement and sound is part of the music program.  While some basic music concepts are covered during the lessons, the teacher adapts the delivery of the content to the group they are teaching.  Music is offered twice weekly to the toddlers and once weekly to the preschool groups.      

French: The Children’s Garden offers children an opportunity to experience the French language in a fun way with our enthusiastic teacher.   The overall goal of the French program is to allow children to grasp the common phrases they can use in everyday life.  The teacher evaluates possible ways to make the French lessons as meaningful and as enjoyable as possible.   Reading, discussions, games, songs and movement are all part of the program.  It is expected that children will be able to recognize that the French language is another way to communicate.  French is offered one day a week and that day will be posted at the beginning of every September for the parents.

Inclusion Policy

Mission:
With the hiring of additional staff (above ratio) The Children’s Garden will provide all supports necessary and allowed by resources.  All children and their families will be treated equally and provided the same learning and accommodation opportunities.

Philosophy:

  • At The Children’s Garden we believe that all children benefit from an inclusive environment by combating discriminatory attitudes and leading to welcoming communities.
  • We believe that all children and their families should have the opportunity to receive quality childcare regardless of any special needs or abilities; all children will be provided equal opportunities.
  • We believe that it is crucial each child reaches their full potential and we are responsible for helping them achieve that by planning around needs and making modifications to ensure each child’s successful participation.  We will provide an environment that is developmentally appropriate regardless of differing needs and abilities. 
  • We believe that if the child is surrounded by a strong support system that works together – including his or her family, our staff, and other professionals involved with the child – that their potential will be recognized and maximized. 
  • We recognize the right of all children and families to participate regardless of ability, gender, race, religion, culture, sexual orientation or economic status.
  • We recognize that the child’s family is crucial to his or her development and will strive to achieve goals the family wishes to see fulfilled, regarding the family as imperative members of our team.  We will work with the family while maintaining and respecting their privacy and individual needs.

Statement:
            At The Children’s Garden, we recognize the right of all children and their families, regardless of abilities or needs, to a high-quality childcare environment of equal opportunity.  So long as space is available for the child, the facility does not restrict the child, and we are able to meet the child’s and family’s needs, we will practice our zero-rejection policy and welcome all with an eager attitude.
            Providing this inclusion will enrich the learning environment for not only the children, but also the staff and other families.  Adults and children alike will benefit from our inclusive environment as our skill sets are challenged and improved, and discriminatory attitudes are diminished.  Our hope is that our care makes a difference child by child to eventually develop a warm and welcoming community to all. 

Policy:

  • We will provide a developmentally appropriate environment to all children, despite differing needs and abilities;
  • We will help the child and their family achieve the child’s developmental goals as our team members will identify learning opportunities throughout the daily routine;
  • We will regard the family’s wishes, goals, and priorities as an essential part of the child’s developmental program and the family will be regarded as an integral part of our team;
  • We will ensure that the child experiences minimal distress;
  • We will ensure that all staff members are familiar with the needs of the child;
  • We will ensure our staff is capable of meeting the needs of any child through continuous development via workshops, clinics, lectures, etc.;
  • We will ensure that other children are also reaching their fullest potential and continuing to be challenged and provided the same learning opportunities.  They will not be adversely affected in any way;
  • We will maximize each child’s potential to ensure that the development of the whole child – emotional, social, cognitive, and physical – is optimized.  

Progress Reports

Your child’s teacher will perform a semi-annual progress report on your child’s development in different areas such as fine-motor, gross motor, socialization skills, daily living skills, etc.  These are performed in November and June each year. These reports are to stay at the daycare and be placed in your child’s file.

Financial Information

  • Automatic withdrawal from your chequing account will take place on the 1st business day of the month.  You will be notified 10 days in advance of the amount that will be withdrawn. Effective April 1, 2012 any family who is not set up on automatic withdrawal, will be charged a $25 administration fee each month.
  • There will be a $25 charge for non-sufficient funds. You will be notified via email if the funds did not clear.  You will have 24 hours to bring your account up to date. There will be a $5 fee for every day your fees are late after the first 24 hours. Your child will not be allowed to attend the program until your account has been paid in full.  Payment must be made in cash or by certified cheque.  No personal cheques will be accepted.
  • We will issue receipts at the end of February for fees paid for childcare services between January and December of the previous year.
  • If your child regularly attends on a day that lands on a statutory holiday you will still be required to pay for that day as the staff must be paid.
  • If your child regularly attends on a day that lands on a storm day in which the Centre has to close, you will be required to pay for that day as staff must be paid.
  • No discount is offered for the 2nd child if both children attend on a full-time basis. 
  • If you stop sending your child to The Children’s Garden without notifying the daycare, we will continue to bill you the latter of:
  • 30 days from the time you notify us in writing
  • 30 days from the time we notify you that your child will no longer be registered in the program.

If you register your child one or more months prior to his or her start date and later change your mind, we require that you inform us in writing one month prior to your child’s start date or your full first month’s payment will not be refunded.

If the client does not make payment when due, the provider will cease to offer child care until full payment is made, including late payment fees.

Change of Information

It is important that we always have up-to-date information regarding your child.  For any change of information, (addresses, phone numbers, pick-up authorization, etc.)  please email or write the Director a note outlining the changes.

A word about the staff

The Children’s Garden provides quality childcare by employing qualified staff that fulfills our expectations regarding program delivery.  We hire only those teachers who possess appropriate training and /or experience.  All staff will undergo a search conducted by the Department of Community Services in conjunction with The National Registry of Child Abusers to ensure that they do not appear on this list.  

Staff is required to continue their education by attending 2 workshops per year.  The Centre itself is viewed as an important educator, and we do fulfill requests to host student teachers.

While we strive to hire staff that is committed to their position, as with any workplace we do experience some staff turnover.  We attempt to inform parents as quickly as possible of any changes in staff and ask that parents understand that this is to be expected and that at no time is your child’s care compromised in any way.

All staff at the daycare is required to sign an agreement that they have read and understood our Behavior Management policy posted on both levels of the preschool.  This Behavior Management Policy outlines the expectations of the Children’s Garden’s staff particularly how they relate to children.  The Staff Manual contains a more detailed procedure that will be followed if the Behavior Management Policy is not adhered to. 

Behavior Management Policy- Staff

GOAL: To assist staff supervising children maintain a consistent, fair and reasonable approach to the management of child behaviour in order to provide a warm, safe, happy, secure environment in which learning can occur.

RATIONAL: A behaviour guidance policy ensures that all staff are clear and consistent about what behaviours are important for children to learn, for the protection and safety of themselves and others.

What is Behaviour Guidance?
Behaviour Guidance is an adult teaching/showing a child:
What is good to do, what is not good to do, what is safe, what angers or hurts, what pleases

STRATEGIES:
The following are strategies given to children to influence their inappropriate behaviour.  It is essential that discipline is, at all times, a positive experience for all involved.
This occurs when discipline:
☺does not damage self-esteem, allows child to feel capable, competent and pleasure to others.
☺ focuses on the misbehavior, not the child.
☺ is directed to the child in private and at eye-level (not yelled across the room).
☺ takes into account the child’s developmental understanding and abilities - recognizing that needs and behaviours change as children grow.
☺ is delivered thru positive reinforcement, especially praise. Discipline must praise and acknowledges caring, cooperative, desirable behaviour.
☺ expresses itself positively - i.e. ‘walk inside’ - not “don’t run inside”.
☺ teaches/gives simple explanations; offers alternative so that a child can make
judgments/choices.... and thus, in time, wise choices
☺ shows what to do, not just what not to do.  Children are told when they did something unacceptable, why it is unacceptable and what they can do instead.
☺ is consistent.  Children are prompted with gentle verbal reprimands when misbehavior occurs.
☺ is based on self-control - not coercion.
☺ leads to self-discipline - recognizing this is a long-term process.
☺ is considered as a learning experience, a normal part of a child’s development

Strategies to use with children
• Know your priorities/limits/buttons/bottom line
• Make expectations clear and age-appropriate. Make sure your explanation is clear and understandable but brief. Make sure you explain why they are not allowed to do something.
• Use Positive Language (tell what you want not what you don’t want)
• Provide predictable and consistency
• Offer choices (share power)
• Anticipate and plan (proactive not reactive)
•Use appropriate voice tone and body language - Yelling or speaking very loudly to the children    is not permitted. We do not want children to fear their teacher. Yelling at a child to stop yelling is redundant; we need to lead by example. A firm voice (teacher voice) is needed. Children need to know you are serious, and what they are doing is “not safe” or “not okay”. We need to have a happy medium between strict and too easy going
•Make consequences specific and immediate
•Be firm, reiterate your expectations
•Pick your battles (don’t sweat the small stuff)
•Step back if frustrated
•Offer praise (be specific)
•Be Respectful of the child
•Spend time and play

Don’t
• React with out thinking
• Nag, over talk, moralize
• Over use “NO” (save it for the really important things)
• Invade personal space
• Embarrass a child
• Get into power struggles
• Blame (focus on the behavior not the child)

Remember that children will need to be reminded daily about safety rules indoors and out. We need to try to avoid using negative terms such as “No”, “Don’t”, “Can’t”.
Here are some examples of positive behavior guidance:

  • Please use your listening ears
  • Use your indoor voice
  • Use your walking feet, running is only for outdoors, slow your feet down
  • Please play gently with your friends, take your hands off your friend’s body, they do not like that
  • It is not okay for you to…
  • Our hands are for helping
  • Find your patience please, use your manners

Strategies and Techniques to be used by staff include:
* Using the least intrusive strategies to gain student compliance (i.e. singing a song, clapping a pattern, turning off the lights, etc.)
* Establishing trust and respect with all children - they are more likely to respond if they know we like them
* Ensuring that all children are treated equally being especially aware of those children who regularly display positive behaviours and who don’t require disciplinary intervention, as well as those with challenging behaviours
* Ensuring that the centre is set up so as to minimize ‘disruptive’ behaviour, ex. enough and varied equipment offered to cater for each age level, clear traffic flows are used etc.
* Planning a pattern of quiet and active activities to prevent over-excitement or over-tiredness
* Being alert to settle or redirect play at the beginning or ending of an activity (transitions times). Give sufficient notice that a change of activity is about to occur.
* Modelling behaviours that we expect the children to use ex. providing examples of caring and cooperative behaviour, speaking appropriately to children and other staff members, listening to what children are saying, taking each other’s feelings/opinions into account etc. Physical contact will be used as a last resort with the intent to guide positive behavior or remove the child(ren) from immediate danger.
* Giving choices to the children to correct their own behavior for example “We need to go inside, you can use your feet to walk or I will carry you, what would you like to do?” If they do not make the decision then carry them.
* Following through. “You need to slow down your feet or you will need to come sit with me” If they do not sit down follow through and help them to sit down.
* Giving attention to appropriate behaviour with specific praise ex. “You waited so well for your turn”; “It was very kind of you to help Suzy find her shoe”.
* Avoiding using “Don’t”, “Can’t” and “No”
* Constantly taking account the child’s developmental needs, abilities, and behaviours, considering their background and possible reasons for behaviour.

* Spending time discussing acceptable behaviours in small group times.

* Try first to distract/diffuse a situation - giving the child an ‘out’, ex. child is resisting sitting down... (pat chair)’your place is here, next to Naomi.’ Or if a child is throwing sand.... “Let’s fill this bucket to the top and then you can turn it over”. Or when play in dolly’s corner deteriorates... “What are we having for dinner? Is it nearly ready...? I’m hungry...”

* Use ‘do’s’ instead of ‘do nots’ giving a simple, brief explanation so that the child can make sense of them and later, apply them independently, ex. ‘It’s fine to run, but outside not inside – there are too many games on the floor and you could slip and hurt yourself or spoil someone’s work’. Or ‘It’s good to whisper and talk gently, but not to be rude - this hurts people’s feelings.’

* Follow through with the consequences - If a child say’s ‘I don’t care’- affirm that YOU do, ex. ‘I care - I don’t want to see another child unhappy’. Proceed to remove that child from the situation, let the child play alone; when you and the child have calmed down, return to the child and talk it over - or if the child is very angry, sit with the child, holding them reassuringly.

* WHEN IT’S OVER...it is essential to restore a positive relationship between you and the child before either of you goes home, ex. Read a story, comment on a positive behaviour you observe the child carrying out.

Some examples of terms not to use!
The word “bad” should never be used to describe a child’s behavior and remember the opposite of “good girl” is “bad girl” so try to avoid it as well. 

When there is no choice, do not give them one. “ We need to sit at the table” instead of “ Sit at the table, okay?” or “Do you want to sit at the table?”

Making fun, or humiliating a child is a form of abuse. Speak to the child privately; do not announce their misbehavior to the rest of the group. Remember that children hear and repeat everything.  Be responsible for what you say.

Specific Inappropriate Behaviours
1. Hitting, punching, kicking, scratching, attacking, throwing things...
☺ Give attention to the hurt child (Call another staff member if necessary)
☺ Kneel and talk to the child engaged in the inappropriate behaviour directly. Explain what the unacceptable behaviour is and why. (Hold child if necessary) ex. ‘You can’t hit Tim because it hurts him’; or ‘I cannot let you hit, you hurt people, and I cannot let them hurt you.’
☺ If child is thrashing etc., move away from other children. Stand nearby and when child has calmed, you can put your arm around and reassure the child that it will be all right.
☺ Praise

2. Biting
☺ Comfort hurt child - call another adult if necessary. Attend to hurt child and get interested in another activity.

Toddlers:  break contact, use verbal explanation, using simple words ex. ‘No biting.’

Preschoolers: Explanation of why behaviour is not acceptable - ‘I will not permit biting. It hurts. I want children to be safe here.’
: Soothing activity - Redirection
: Reinforce acceptable behaviour
☺ If ongoing, a closer look may need to be taken at the child’s overall behaviour. Refer ‘Dealing with Repeated Biting incidents’ & ‘Persistent Inappropriate Behaviour Guidance Policy’.

3. Ugly words (hate, loser, sucks)
☺ Ignore if situation allows (ex. other children aren’t within hearing)
☺ Let child know we are concerned ex. “I don’t like hearing those words at The Children’s Garden”.
☺ Explain that we don’t use those words at The Children’s Garden.

4. Spitting
☺ Stop child from spitting and say ‘I will not let you spit at The Children’s Garden.
If you have to spit, do it in the toilet or a tissue, ex. Tell them where they can spit, but that they cannot spit at people. Older children can help clean up and disinfect the area.

5. What to do when children refuse to join in activities.
☺ Assess situation
☺ Simply accept them as they are. Move about with an air of gentle control. Make it clear you will help if the children want help, but do not press them. The children will usually respond when you say ‘If you want to watch for a while, that’s okay...and if you need help or want to talk, I’ll be right here (or) you can join in when you’re ready’.

Confidentiality: At no time are specific children to be discussed in front of other children or adults (visitors, parents etc.) as general playroom discussion. This is to be kept for an area that is private such as the staffroom, office etc. Information concerning a child’s behaviour is not to be conveyed to parents in front of a child. The child is to be removed from the situation or a time organized for a private discussion.

Things to keep in mind:

  • A child is not capable of telling you why he/she did something.  It is beyond their ability. 
  • In any instance where a child is hurting themselves or someone else, remove them from that area, talk to them about their behavior, and re-direct them to another area if you feel it is safe for them to return.  If not, try sitting with them, take them to an area with no distractions and speak quietly until they have calmed down.
  • Time out has become much overused in the daycare profession. It is not permitted. If you feel your child needs some “down time” find a quiet activity they can do and re-direct them to another area.
  • During free play make sure you can see all children in the room. Make sure that if you are playing with one child your back isn’t turned on the other children you are responsible for. 
  • Remember that free play does not mean free time to work or socialize with co-workers. Keep conversations short with both parents and other staff members; let them know that you need to be with the children.
  • When in doubt always ask another co- worker before making your own assumptions. Remember that teamwork is essential.
  • Always use your own judgment regardless of what you see others doing.  Do not conform if you do not think it is okay.
  • If a parent asks you to use a strategy or technique that he / she uses at home please feel free to do so as long as it falls within our guidelines.

Custody

If you are legally separated or divorced, a copy of your custody papers must be submitted upon registration. This is for your protection, as well as the centers. If a non-custodial parent/guardian has access which falls within the house of centre care, a written schedule of access is to be given to the centre.

Many families today are going through separation or divorce and parent/guardian are expected to help the child(ren) in the transition by informing the centre and staff of the custody agreement. In cases of joint custody, we would like to know the child's schedule so we can relate to the daily or weekly cycle of co-parent/guardian. When one parent/guardian has custody, we will release the child to the other parent/guardian according to the scheduled access agreed upon by those parent/guardian and filed at the centre. Both parent/guardian have access to the child(ren) unless we have a written notice to the contrary. Custody agreements are kept at the centre and with staff on outings away from the centre.

Confidentiality

It is our policy to respect the confidential data of the children and families enrolled at our center.  Your child’s development, medical and personal information will not be discussed with other parents. As well, we will not divulge your phone numbers to other parents without your consent.

Childhood Illness Policy

Parents must call in if their child is out sick to communicate the symptoms that their child is experiencing. We are required by the Department of Health to keep this information on file.  Because children are more susceptible to communicable diseases and illnesses it is important that staff and parents follow strict control practices.  As a result we have created the following policy using both Community Services and Public Health Services Guidelines.  Please read over the following information carefully as it will be strictly enforced.

Based on Guidelines for Communicable Disease Control in Daycares  (prepared by Public Health Services-Central Regional Health Board)  we divide communicable illness into four categories:

  1. Respiratory – these illnesses are caused by germs found in saliva and nasal secretions and are spread via the respiratory tract when infected persons sneeze or cough.  Coughs and colds are among the respiratory illnesses.  Children with only mild symptoms who can take part in all activities of the program will be allowed to enter the preschool, but children with fever, earache, listlessness or excessive sleepiness, skin rash, excessive fussiness or crankiness, difficulty breathing, or persistent cough, will be sent home.
  2. Gastrointestinal – these illnesses are spread via the fecal-oral route.  Diarrhea is the most common symptom of these illnesses. Diarrhea is defined as any change from the child’s normal stool (i.e, solid or semi-solid to a liquid, or semi-liquid state).  Severe cases of diarrhea can lead to serious dehydration problems, especially in infants.  While some children may only have a mild case, the children they infect could end up becoming seriously ill and therefore, children with more than one instance of diarrhea WILL BE SENT HOME IMMEDIATELY and must stay home until 24 HOURS after the diarrhea HAS STOPPED.  If your child has had diarrhea at home do not bring them to the centre until the 24 hours has passed.

Vomiting is another symptom of gastrointestinal illness. Severe cases of vomiting can lead to serious dehydration problems, especially in infants.  While some children may only have a mild case, the children they infect could end up becoming seriously ill and therefore, children who are vomiting WILL BE SENT HOME IMMEDIATELY and must stay home until 24 HOURS after the vomiting HAS STOPPED.  If your child has been vomiting at home do not bring them to the centre until the 24 hours has passed.

Gastrointestinal illnesses may also include symptoms of abdominal cramps, fever, and nausea.  Children with these symptoms may also be sent home, depending on the severity of the symptoms.

3. Rashes – A rash can be a symptom of many communicable illnesses and one rash may be difficult to distinguish from another.  Rashes are spread through physical contact, through the air, and through contact with fecal matter.  Some rashes are not infectious, such as eczema and heat rash.  For these your child will not be sent home.  But for any other rashes you will be required to come and pick up your child immediately.  Your child will not be able to return to the preschool until the rash is completely gone or you have written notice from a physician stating that the rash is not contagious.

4. Other Illnesses – When a child is unable to participate in the program due to any of the following symptoms they will be sent home and you will need to keep them home until they are able to participate fully in the program.  These symptoms include:  fever, listlessness, excessive sleepiness, and excessive fussiness or crankiness or otherwise unusual behavior.

Please refer to the following Communicable Disease Chart for illnesses, symptoms, infectious periods, and exclusion information

Common Childhood Illness / Diseases

Illness Symptoms Infectious Period Return Date
Cold Stuffy or runny nose, sneezing, watering eyes Varies When the child can participate in all parts of the program.
Flu Sore throat, muscular aches, fever, chills, vomiting, diarrhea Varies When the child can participate in all parts of the program.
Diarrheal Diseases Abnormal loose stool (may contain blood), cramps, vomiting As long as the child has diarrhea, they are contagious Diarrhea can be infectious.  24 hours after the diarrhea has completely stopped.
Strep throat Red and painful throat.  Fever, swollen neck glands, while patches on tonsils. Until treated 48 hours after antibiotic treatment has begun
Pink Eye Redness, itching, pain, discharge from the eye, swelling of the eyelid For duration of illness or until 24 hrs after treatment has started 24 hours after treatment has started, only if discharge has ceased
Impetigo Spreading sores, which can develop golden color crusty areas.  Little dot-like sores spread around the original sores.  Can appear on the face, hands, legs, feet, and buttocks. From onset of rash until 24 hrs after the start of the antibiotic treatment 24 hours after the antibiotic treatment has started
 Chicken Pox Fever, raised red itchy spot-like rash that turns into blisters then scabs.  Mainly on the face and body. Up to 5 days before the rash appears until all blisters have scabbed over When all the chicken pox have scabbed over and there are no new blisters
Head Lice Itchy scalp, small silvery eggs (nits) attached to the base of the hair near the root, esp. at nape of neck and behind the ears Until properly treated Day after treatment begins
Meningitis Flu-like symptoms, fever, vomiting, stiff neck, coma, seizures As long as bacteria are present When a physician gives a clear medical report
Mumps Large swelling from face to neck, jaw and in front of the ears.  Often accompanied by cold-like symptoms Up to 7 days before and until 9 days after swelling.  Most infectious 2 days before onset of swelling 9 days after swelling begins
German measles Fever, cold-like symptoms followed by a fine red rash, swollen glands behind ears 3 days before until 7 days after onset of rash 7 days after onset of rash
Red measles Fever, cough, runny nose and inflamed, light sensitive eyes.  1-3 days later a flat dull red rash and blotches first appear on face and spread to body 3-5 days before onset of rash until 4 days after onset of rash 5 days after onset of rash
 Whopping Cough Cold with runny nose and cough.  Cough spasms become progressively worse.  Vomiting or loss of breath, “whoop” may be present From onset of symptoms until 3 weeks after onset of coughing After 5 days of antibiotic treatment
Hepatitis A Fatigue, nausea, flu-like symptoms, jaundice, vomiting, dark urine, pale stools 2 weeks before until 1 week after jaundice One week after illness appears
Fever Usually a sign of infection N/A Until fever is gone
Fifth Disease Low grade fever, flu-like symptoms, 7-10 days after onset, a distinct “slapped cheek” facial rash appears, spreads to trunk and develops into a lacy pattern on arms and legs Before onset of rash. 1-3 days Until rash is gone
Giardiasis Loose stool, cramps, gas, vomiting Until free of the giardia parasite Under direction from Public Health Services
Hand Foot and Mouth Disease Fever, headache, sore throat and rash.  Red spots often with small blisters on top may appear especially on hands, feet and inside mouth For 1 to 2 weeks from onset of illness When the child can participate in all parts of the program
Pinworm Itching around anus or vagina For the duration of the infection With notice from a physician
Ringworm Ring shaped rash with raised edge on skin or scalp.  Often itchy and flaky.  May cause bald areas. From onset until medical treatment has been started After treatment has started
Scabies Very itchy rash, worse at night on fingers, elbows, armpits, wrists, abdomen Until treated After treatment has started, treatment of household contacts is necessary
Vomiting Vomiting, cramps, diarrhea As long as the child is vomiting, they are contagious 24 hours after the vomiting has completely stopped.

Fever Chart

 

 

37.0

98.6

 

Normal

 

37.22

99.0

Normal

37.50

99.5

Take note of the fever.  Monitor behaviour & watch for an increase.

37.77

100.0

Take note of the fever.  Monitor behaviour & watch for an increase.

38.33

101.0

Parents should be called.   Monitor behaviour & watch for an increase.

38.88

102.0

Parents need to be called.  It is recommended that the child should be sent home.

39.44

103.0

Parents need to be called & the child should be sent home.

40.0

104.0

Parents need to be called.  Medical attention is recommended.

**  Note the child’s behaviour as well.  Signs of diarrhea, nausea, listlessness, general crankiness, etc. should be taken into account.

The child should be sent home if they are unable to participate fully in the program for any of the above reasons.

If a child is vomiting or has diarrhea more than once they MUST be sent home.

Parents are asked to read over the illness policy very carefully and to sign the written agreement below and return it to their child’s teacher to be kept on file.

………………………………………………………………………

Confirmation of Receipt

Child’s name ______________________________ 

I have read the Parent Policy Manual for The Children’s Garden and agree to abide by the policies and procedures found within. 

__________________________________________   ____________________________
Parent/Guardian Signature                                                                                       Date

 

__________________________________________   ____________________________
Parent/Guardian Signature                                                                                        Date

………………………………………………………………………………

I have read the Illness Policy and agree to abide by the policies and procedures found within.

_____________________________________________   _________________________
Parent/guardian Signature                                                                                                   Date

 

_____________________________________________   _________________________
Parent/Guardian Signature                                                                                                     Date

………………………………………………………………………………

_____________________________________________   _________________________
Director’s Signature                                                                                                     Date